In Memory of My Pop a WWI Soldier, who Fought for Honesty and Freedom

As a child of the Sixties I absorbed the new ‘freedoms’  of that era like a sponge; I watched the development of  the sexual revolution which, to me was everyday women finding a voice, previously before only accessible to the middle class and above.  I read about the Civil Rights movement, and became sickened by the Racial prejudice and discrimination; particularly as I was friends with many children whose families had come to the UK as refugees from Uganda. These struggles instilled me with a personal power, no longer did I have to defer to my ‘betters’, I could and should, question and challenge my elders.

Having said this, my strongest influence at home at this time was my granddad (Pop), he was born in 1899 and lied about his age to serve his country in WW,  only for him to be the victim of a rogue grenade. This resulted in him spending his life in and out of hospital undergoing surgery after surgery, as the countless pieces of shrapnel he carried in him moved towards his vital organs. I adored him, but he was a man of his time born when Victoria was still Queen, and we had endless discussions about right and wrong. I like to think he really heard me when I argued for Equality, but maybe he indulged me as his only grandchild, either way he listened, and even when we disagreed he never shot me down, he taught me to debate and for this, and everything else he was to me, I adored him .

With today being the Centenary of  WWI, these memories of my pop are more emotive than ever, his desire for honesty was I believe, born from his experience of soldiering, he was sold a story of  ‘Britain needing him’  how he was fighting for freedom and this would be “The War to end All wars”; in return he was damaged, physically and emotionally. He never spoke to me (or any other family members) about his experience, but we lived with its effects.  Today I’m convinced he would have been diagnosed with PTSD, he certainly suffered from brain damage, being blown up does that, and this revealed itself in his occasional outbursts of rage. However, despite the pain he lived with for the next 70 years, he always demanded Truth; whether this be because he lived with the fact he suffered as a result of the Lies sold by the ruling classes I can’t say, but knowing him I can’t help but think this is so.

These experiences laid the blueprint for who I am today, I remain committed to Equality, I fail to understand how prejudice and discrimination are anything but destructive, and I believe wholeheartedly in Truth. In this week as I especially remember Pop, I read that  Lord Freud  has been proven to have Lied AGAIN,  joining Mark Hoban, Esther McVey and Mike Penning  to become the Fourth DWP Minster to have Made the SAME LIE – Impact Assessment are Impossible.

This default position of Lying when proven incorrect is unacceptable, the reality is the Lies Politicians spew out today, are resulting in pain as those told 100 years did; and albeit in much lesser numbers, people are still Dying  as a result of the Policies they Lie about.

I can’t help but think it must be common knowledge that Politicians Lie, they’ve been doing it for at least a Century now, and maybe this is the reason people don’t feel the need to demand it should End and End Now?

I can’t and won’t accept this, to do so would not only dishonour my Pop, but I would feel  in collusion with these Lying Ministers, and this I will not do. For these reasons and because I feel if We don’t scrutinise this unelected Government No one will; I continue to urge you all to please share our petition demanding TRUTH from Parliament; the House of Commons has responded to the Recommendations of the Select by basically informing us the DWP is doing a great job!

If you share my belief , this response is yet another example of Government Spin – please Sign, Share and talk to everyone about the NEED for The TRUTH Campaign.

 

#NOWPetition #ImpeachDWP

Advertisements

15 thoughts on “In Memory of My Pop a WWI Soldier, who Fought for Honesty and Freedom

  1. I particularly ‘liked’ this one. Not too sure about the description of yourself as a “sponge’. You wern’t inadvertently used to wipe up kitchen ‘spills’ were you?

    Like

  2. I was never lucky enough to have a granddad – and I often thought it quite sad. They didn’t die in the wars but did fight in them. I only had my grandmothers and you couldn’t really talk to them as my maternal nanna was of the “children will only speak when spoken to” – and my other nan was a drunk, mother of 11 and bitter due to her husband leaving her due to her alcoholism, and to be perfectly honest, he did the right thing.
    My nanna (whom I did adore even though she still lived in the past) died when I was 6 😦 and my other nan wouldn’t have known me, or most of her grandchildren, if she had drunkenly fallen over us 🙂
    How I longed for a granddad, someone who could tell me all about those shattered buildings, all about the bombsites we played on, all about the escapes, the fighting, the guns, the noise, the airplanes etc – and I’m a girl! 😀 I love to read books about the wars, true and fiction, and how I love to immerse myself into them to become the main character in the books so that I can understand why and what happened.
    So, to all of those “Pops” and those “Nanna’s” who fought and who worked through WW1 – I raise a glass to you all and thank you from the bottom of my heart for making me free!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Pingback: ‘In Memory of My Pop a WWI Soldier, who Fought for Honesty and Freedom’ | Vox Political

    • You say – “I adored him, but he was a man of his time born when Victoria was still Queen, and we had endless discussions about right and wrong.” You have hit on one of the fundamental differences between the generations. What is right for one, won’t necessarily suit the other. Great post – thank you. 🙂

      Like

  4. Pingback: In Memory of My Pop a WWI Soldier, who Fought f...

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s